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Kiss and Tell | Alison Stuart

In Creative Writing, Interview by RWA Blog CoordinatorLeave a Comment

Set in Victoria in the 1870s, The Postmistress tells the tale of Adelaide Greaves and the life she forges in the gold-mining town of Maiden’s Creek. Having worked hard to create a new identity and future for herself, her son Danny and her maid Netty, Adelaide has little time for friendships, let alone relationships. Her quiet existence is sent into a spin with the arrival of Caleb Hunt, a handsome but battle-weary American still reeling from the civil war. Both have their secrets and independent streaks wider than the Shenandoah River, but before long, romance blossoms in the tinder-dry bush …

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Tips from and Industry Insider | Marketing Strategies for New Releases

In Creative Writing, Guest Articles, Indie Publishing, Publishing Industry by RWA Blog CoordinatorLeave a Comment

Now that I’m an author as well as a publicist, I know why everybody groans when the word ‘marketing’ comes up. It’s a hungry monster with a never-ending appetite. How do you know what to feed it? And how do you plan meal times so that it doesn’t take up every minute of your writing, leisure and family time? The key is to not give in to demand feeding.

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Simply Writing| A Four letter word called PLOT by Ebony McKenna

In Creative Writing, Guest Articles by RWA Blog Coordinator21 Comments

Welcome everyone! A while ago I asked what topics you’d like covered, and Toni mentioned she’d love a post on plotting. As a pantser, I don’t believe I’m the best person to offer advice, so I’ve asked Ebony McKenna, author of Edit Your Romance Novel, to give us a rundown on her process of plotting. I hope you guys find this post as interesting and helpful as I did ☺

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Setting and Context |A PEEK BEHIND THE SCENES WITH STELLA QUINN

In Creative Writing, Guest Articles by RWA Blog CoordinatorLeave a Comment

Episode 3 Australia’s Great Southern Land Rural romance is always popular, and I wonder what makes it so? Is it the history of rural settings? The rugged outdoors, the smalltown cosy factor, the sense of life being lived at a slower, more meaningful pace? The appeal of RuRo no doubt varies from reader to reader, but it is indisputable that setting and context must play a leading role in that appeal.